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Sufganiyot (Israeli Jelly Donuts)

Sufganiyot (Israeli Jelly Donuts)

Ingredients (10)

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting the baking sheet and rolling out the dough
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 (1/4-ounce) packet active dry yeast (2 1/4 teaspoons)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine salt
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup warm whole milk (105°F to 115°F)
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter (1/4 stick), at room temperature
  • 6 cups (1 1/2 quarts) vegetable or canola oil, for frying, plus more for coating the bowl
  • 2/3 cup smooth jam or jelly
  • Powdered sugar, for dusting
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Nutritional Information
  • Calories108
  • Fat5.2g
  • Saturated fat1.01g
  • Trans fat0.05g
  • Carbs14.14g
  • Fiber0.38g
  • Sugar6.21g
  • Protein1.39g
  • Cholesterol14.94mg
  • Sodium44.63mg
  • Nutritional Analysis per serving (30 servings) Powered by

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While latkes are the snack most commonly associated with Hanukkah, sufganiyot are more commonly consumed in Israel. We can see why, because they are addictive and don’t leave the house as smelly.

Special equipment: You will need a 2-inch round cutter. If you don’t have one, you can use a drinking glass of the same size.

You will also need a candy/fat thermometer, as well as a 12- to 18-inch pastry bag fitted with a 1/4-inch round tip to fill the donuts with jam or jelly.

Game plan: When deep-frying, make sure the oil stays at a constant temperature, adjusting your stove’s heat as necessary.

This recipe was featured as part of our Hanukkah Recipes photo gallery.

Instructions

  1. 1Place the flour, sugar, yeast, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer and whisk to combine. Add the yolks and milk and mix, using the hook attachment, on medium-low speed until a shaggy dough forms, about 1 minute. Add the butter, increase the speed to medium high, and mix until the dough is smooth, shiny, and elastic, about 5 minutes.
  2. 2Coat a large bowl with oil. Form the dough into a ball, place in the bowl, and turn to coat in the oil. Cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
  3. 3Lightly flour a baking sheet; set aside. Punch down the dough, transfer to a lightly floured work surface, and roll until about 1/4 inch thick. Using a 2-inch round cutter, stamp out as many dough rounds as possible and place on the prepared baking sheet about 1/2 inch apart. Gather the dough scraps into a ball and roll out again, stamping rounds until you have 30 total on the baking sheet. Cover loosely with plastic wrap or a damp towel. Let rise in a warm place until puffy and about 1/2 inch thick, about 30 minutes.
  4. 4Place the vegetable or canola oil in a Dutch oven or a large, heavy-bottomed pot and set over medium heat until the temperature reaches 350°F on a candy/fat thermometer. Meanwhile, line a second baking sheet with paper towels and place a wire rack over the paper towels; set aside. Place the jam or jelly in a piping bag fitted with a 1/4-inch round tip; set aside.
  5. 5Using a flat spatula (don’t use your hands—this will deflate the donuts), carefully transfer the dough rounds, one at a time, into the oil. You should be able to fit about 6 at a time, leaving at least 1 inch of space in between and keeping the oil temperature at 350°F. Fry until the bottoms are golden brown, about 1 1/2 minutes. Carefully flip with a fork and fry until the second side is golden brown, about 1 1/2 minutes more. (If air bubbles appear in the donuts, pierce with the tip of a paring knife.) Remove with a slotted spoon to the wire rack. Repeat with the remaining dough rounds.
  6. 6When the donuts are cool enough to handle, use a paring knife to puncture the side of each to form a pocket in the center. Place the tip of the piping bag into the pocket and pipe about 1 teaspoon of jam or jelly inside. Dust with powdered sugar before serving.
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