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May 10th meals

Nathan Lee | Jun 2, 2003 09:19 PM

I'm a little late in writing this report, and I really don't remember most of what I ate that day. I did ask this board and it's members for help with restaurants, parking and wine (offline).

I got married on May 10th. The highlight (food wise) of the day was the roast piglet which I brought over to my in-laws. My wife sarcastically called that tradition the "pig exchange". It's not a suckling pig as Melanie Wong clarified because it's not under 15lbs. It was close at 20lbs. I've called pig farms from Modesto to Nebraska looking for Isoweened piglets (7-12lbs) but the only place that had it charged too much. I also called at a bad time when there was a shortage of this size piglets. Anyways, I take the piping hot pig over and it was cut up just as Yimster said where the head, 4 feet and hind quarters was returned to the grooms party. All the guys stood around the pig as it was being cut (by a member of the brides family) and sampled the pieces off the back. Let me tell you, it was the best roast piglet outside of Hong Kong and Saigon. EVERYONE came over to take pices of the pig. We delayed the tea ceremony to eat most of the bride's side of the pig. We're planning on making it a tradition to have a roast piglet from Cheung Hing for either Thanksgiving or christmas. It helps that my parents are friends with the owners. They promised the pig would be special and they delivered. I think it came out at $128 and I don't believe it was discounted, but I'm not sure.

Oh in addition to the pig I also brought over some "ga nui beng" literally translated as "marrying girl cookies". These consisted of the largest almond cookies I've ever seen (8" across and 1" thick), whole thousand year old eggs in pastry, another pastry with ground lotus seed paste? They were part of the "Pig Exchange".

The wedding was at Crystal Springs Golf Course followed by wine and food. The only thing I ate there was the one bite of raspberry and lemon cake fed to me by my wife for the picture op. Everyone else told me that the oysters, salmon,...etc were really good.

On to the banquet at Gold Mountain restaurant on Broadway. I remember these dishes.
1st dish: cold plate with roast pork, cha siu (BBQ pork), jelly fish, and cold beef slices,
2nd dish: fried crab claw wrapped with minced shrimp covered in a batter. It was too hot, don't remember the flavor.
3rd dish: shark fin soup
4th dish: fried chicken but it was suppose to be Peking duck. My dad like the "sound" of chicken which is "gai" because it was fortuitous to have "ho sai gai" which means "good world" which is another way of saying to get rick in Cantonese. Oh yeah, I told my wife that the chicken was switch for the duck and I swore I thougth she was going to hit her new father-in-law with the bottle of Remy. This the same girl that ate at six different duck places in Beijing in search of the perfect Peking duck.
5th dish: sauteed squab over snap peas. There were two squab heads with way too much meat. I don't know any person that can get that much meat off two squab, so I suspect some of the sauteed meat was dark meat chicken.
6th dish: forgot, this is where it gets hazy, but maybe lobster
7th dish: don't recall
8th dish: see 7th dish
9th dish: lobster with mushroom over a vegetable (mustard greens?)

Overall we had a great time. Thanks to members of this board, I had instructions to Gold Mountain printed w/map.

Nathan

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