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Pickled Ramps

Ingredients (7)

For the ramps:

  • 1 pound ramps

For the pickling brine:

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup rice wine vinegar
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon Japanese seven spice (Shichimi Togarashi)
  • 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons Korean crushed red pepper (kochukaru) or other mild crushed chile pepper
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Nutritional Information
  • Calories195
  • Fat0.51g
  • Saturated fat0.09g
  • Trans fat
  • Carbs46.92g
  • Fiber3.66g
  • Sugar40.28g
  • Protein2.36g
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium564.98mg
  • Nutritional Analysis per serving (4 servings) Powered by

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Pickled Ramps

Ramps are wild leeks, foraged in the spring. They can be grilled, braised, or roasted. David Chang of Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York likes to pickle them for his spring pickle plate. He was nice enough to share his recipe.

What to buy: You can buy Japanese seven spice from the Savory Spice Shop or make it yourself. Korean chile powder is available in some Asian markets.

Instructions

For the ramps:
  1. 1If the ramps are very young and tender, you can leave the green tops on; if they are mushy or dried out, slice off the tops about 1/4 inch above where the stem turns white. (If the ramps are more mature and have a large bulb, blanch them briefly in salted water before pickling.)
  2. 2Trim away the roots. Peel away any dried or dirty layers and rinse several times to remove dirt and debris. Place ramps in a large heatproof, nonreactive bowl.

For the pickling brine:

  1. 1Combine all ingredients in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved, then pour over ramps. (It might seem like there’s not enough brine, but don’t worry—once the ramps wilt there will be more than enough.)
  2. 2Let the ramps cool to room temperature, then transfer to a smaller nonreactive container, cover tightly, and place in the refrigerator overnight.
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