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Taipei: LongShan & Shilin Night Market-Trip Report

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Taipei: LongShan & Shilin Night Market-Trip Report

citywayne | Dec 29, 2007 11:49 PM

A follow up to my post requesting recs.
We went over to LongShan Temple night market. I had been advised to not go there because, I was told it's a bit 'seedy' there. It had been years since I was over there and just had to try it again. The snake restaurants are still there ... but the whole place looks a lot better than it did previously.
A GREAT place for Wu Jiao Bing is just across from the MRT #1 exit. Look for the MRT #2 exit across the road and walk along that main road until you come to the smaller street (you have just crossed the plaza) and look for the 1st alley way. There will probably be a bunch of people waiting for a batch of bing to finish cooking. They are 45nt$. They are a bit pricier than others I have seen (30nt to 40nt), but worth the additional cost.
Along the night market there was another lady with WJB, @30nt. It was almost as good. The skin was not as nicely cooked (some burnt parts), and the filling was not consistent (some parts had more dough then others), but the filling was just as good. I think I would have been happy with hers if I had not tasted the other guys 1st. But do give it a try.
I tried a bowl of eel herbal soup along one of the night market streets. I think it was one of the few that had this delicacy. It was at the end of one of the streets and also served stinky tofu (an interesting combination). They put plenty of eel in there although they skimp a little on the herbs. I liked it ... but then I'm the guy always looking for the unusual on a menu.
Finally along the main night market street (same street as the temple), we tried one of the sweet snacks. I don't know what you call them, but it's like a pancake batter that they make into little round 'cakes' (about 2 1/2 inches across and 1 1/2 inches thick), filled with red bean, custard, or peanut 'custard'. My wife loves these things and declared these the best she has ever had. The red bean filling was ample and just the right texture. The 'batter' was just the right consistency also. She said next time we are in the neighborhood, we are stopping by and stocking up on them. She said they should freeze well and you can reheat in a toaster oven (?).

We did make it back to the Shilin night market too. We had the 'big big' fried chicken again (always a winner with a big line). In the actual night market (not the food court) I found a place that said it was another location of a Wu Jiao Bing place from Rao He Street. With the great experiences at Long Shan, I had to try them. They were very good also, but as with one of the other, the outside was a bit burnt and too much dough in some parts of it. But it was worth the 40nt. It also had the 'long line' seal of approval.
I finally had a bowl of the oyster noodles. It was ok. It had pigs intestine in there too, which gave it a bit too strong of a flavor. It also did not have enough oysters in it. I will have to find a place that does it better. I did like the overall flavor of the stuff.
Other items consumed were not worth mentioning. I did see a big line at one of the jian bao places, but I was full by that time and will try that one next time (the Jiantan stop is one the way home).

Trying to fit in Rao He St. market sometime soon. Will get back to you all when I do.

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