Restaurants & Bars

Best won ton mee in Singapore

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Best won ton mee in Singapore

ju | Jan 26, 2005 04:56 PM

Having spent the last 15 months in my hometown, Singapore, getting reacquainted with all the great food to be had there, I'd settled into a kind of prolonged post-prandial stupor, unable to summon the energy to post my findings on Chowhound. However, now that I'm back to the howling winds and unending snowstorms of Massachussetts, I find myself home-bound and with time on my hands. So here's my first post on my S'pore finds.

It took me many excursions and tastings, but I believe I've found the place that serves the best won ton mee in S'pore. (Thank you, Adelia, for this tip). It's a stall simply called "Mien" (Mandarin for noodles), in a dilapidated coffee shop on Rowell Road (the Serangoon Rd end). Run (but not owned) by two Indonesian Chinese ladies, it serves 'Malaysian-style' wonton mee, i.e. sauced with a brown gravy, versus the 'Singapore-style' ketchup-sauced version. I prefer their dry (kon-lo) version: springy thin egg noodles, perfectly cooked al dente, tossed in a sauce that, as far as I can figure out, includes shallot-flavoured oil (perhaps even lard?), sesame oil, soy sauce, kicap manis (that Indonesian influence showing here). Topped with slices of char siew, bits of choi sum, a couple of triangular fried won tons, and served with a small bowl of soup in which float another couple of (boiled) won tons. The won ton filling is delicious - besides minced pork and shrimp, there is a secret and unusual ingredient: minced squid! (Thanks, mom, for spying on the cook while she prepared a batch of the filling). Each order is $3 - a little pricey for coffeeshop food, but worth every penny.

What makes it tops on my list are the perfect texture of the noodles (chewy and resilient), the sauce (slightly sweet, deep notes of unctuous flavour) and, of course, those won tons. Plus the care and pride the cook puts into her food.

You can also get good kopi or teh peng (iced local coffee or tea) with your noodles. The ladies run the beverage stall as well, with the help of a very nice and helpful mute gentleman.

The stall opens from 7.30am to 1pm.

Directions: Rowell Road (a 1-way street) is off Serangoon Rd - it's the 10th street on the right after the Serangoon Rd/Sungei Rd intersection, or one street before and parallel to the infamous Desker Rd. The coffee shop is the 5th or 6th storefront from the corner, on your right. It shares the premises with a roti prata stall.

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