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有的在华埠的饭店把菜投入太多的糖 For Those Wanting to Avoid the Taste of Sugar in Chinese Cusine

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有的在华埠的饭店把菜投入太多的糖 For Those Wanting to Avoid the Taste of Sugar in Chinese Cusine

jonkyo | Jan 4, 2012 12:22 AM

Have you ever ordered a dish, and the sugar content just spoils it?

This has happened, especially with Italian and Chinese food. We all know that Taiwan grows sugar cane, and so does Jamaica. As far as I know, this sugar thing does manifest itself in some Southern Chinese cooking, though I do have to say, please correct me if I am wrong, it does not so much affect dishes of the Caribbean.

I have had authentic cuisine from both regions.

The sugar content that is sometimes added to dishes in Chinatown restaurants can be too much, though it is seldom that this traverses the level of tolerable, but it does happen.

I will forgo naming the restaurant, because it is actually really good, and only state that if you are indeed similar in eating habit as I and truly find the addition of sugar into dishes to be detrimental to enjoying the dish, please take heed:

I recently had a dish going by the Chinese title as 炒下水 that included an delightful assortment of all things that could make a good dish: duck liver, cauliflower, cut thick mushroom, pig or duck blood sliced item, and onion. It was a soupy dish but not soup, just accompanied with juice.

I enjoyed eating its thick animal matter content, but was very turned off by what I would identify as the over use of sugar in the preparation of this dish. At $10.00 for this item, I was disappointed, but am reminded of practices I have used in mostly Southern Chinese venue, here and there, and elsewhere:

对不起, 我不有麻烦你但我不太喜欢甜甜的味道:

"Excuse me but I hate to bother you, just to let you know that I am not too keen on sweet tasting food."

If the staff and kitchen can accomodate such a request, they will, with pleasure, but some places are not so flexible. We live in a pluralistic universe.

It is really nothing to mention politely when looking at the menu with waiter or waitress present to state that sugar is not so agreeable to you taste. They may steer you towards appropiate items, or may request the kitchen to accomodate such with your desired order.

With Italian restaurants, this is not an option. If the sauce is sweet, that is what you get. This is a good measure to entirely eliminate, in regards to Italian establishmens, some restaurants from your dining itinerary, if one is of this preference。I hav done that in places I have rsided.

If you are curious of Delux Food Market on Elizebeth, and detest the taste of sugar in items not intended to be sweet (ei: ice cream) then take heed, much of the pre-prepaed food is so sweet, meaning all the meats and organ items, it is not worth trying.

I visit Delux Food Market, and have no problem due to the fact that I stick to Taishan pigs feet as opposed to the other on the opposite side, as well as other items I have found that are not sweet. My homes have been sugar free for more than a decade, and many people have mentioned at times my cooking is quite good.

This is a related post “Sugar in Chinese/Thai/Vietnamese food - eek!

I grew up in Hong Kong.”:

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/337384

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Deluxe Food Market
79 Elizabeth St, New York, NY 10013

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