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ISO the Best BBQ Sauces

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ISO the Best BBQ Sauces

Wayne Keyser | May 5, 2005 11:06 PM

(This posting, a response to a posting on General Topics has been moved here by the Chowhound Team.)

Subject: Re(1): ISO the Best BBQ Sauces
Name: Wayne Keyser
Posted: May 05, 2005 at 20:54:20

In Reply To: ISO the Best BBQ Sauces
Posted by David Kahn on May 05, 2005 at 18:53:50

Message:
Is "authentic" really an applicable word in this case? There are so many regional approaches:

North & South Carolina style
Barbecued whole hog, pork shoulder and ribs, with a thin tomato-vinegar sauce

2 cups Cider Vinegar
2/3 cup Catsup
½ cup Brown Sugar
1 tablespoon Tabasco Sauce
1 tablespoon Lemon Juice
1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
2 tablespoons Butter
1 teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes
1 teaspoon Dry Mustard
½ teaspoon Salt
½ teaspoon Pepper
Mix all ingredients together and cook over medium heat for 30 minutes.

GEORGIA STYLE
Pork with a mustard-based sauce

1 cup Prepared Yellow Mustard
½ cup Balsamic Vinegar
1/3 cup Brown Sugar, packed
2 tablespoons Butter
1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce
1 tablespoon Lemon Juice
1 tablespoon Molasses
1 teaspoon Cayenne Pepper
Mix all ingredients together and cook over medium heat for 30 minutes.

Kansas City style
Sweet and tomato-based, like "KC Masterpiece" and other bottled mass-market sauces.
I have a great one of my own:

Catsup (about half the volume of the sauce you want to make)
Dark Brown Sugar (a good bit — how sweet do you want it?)
Dark Molasses (1-3 tablespoons for a cup of sauce)
Vietnamese Sriracha Hot Sauce (about half as much as there is catsup)

Mix it all together with a fork or your finger and serve it … you will get compliments! (Note: a semi-clean finger is preferred! Sorry, guys, that's the way I cook.) Makes just one meal worth, or enough to choke a horse, depending.

ALABAMA STYLE
Alabama has a white barbecue sauce

1 cup Mayonnaise
½ cup White Vinegar
1 tablespoon Lemon Juice
1 teaspoon each Salt and Pepper

Combine in a non-reactive (glass or plastic) bowl and refrigerate for at least 8 hours before using. Use as you would regular barbecue sauce.

Memphis style
Dry rub, mostly - sometimes sauce on the side, but that's for wimps.
Here's a sauce you can use when you invite wimps to dinner:


2 cups Catsup
2 cups chopped Onion
1 cup Red Wine Vinegar
2 cloves Garlic, minced
¼ cup Prepared Yellow Mustard
½ cup Brown Sugar, packed
½ teaspoon Tabasco Sauce
Blend all ingredients and simmer over low heat for 15 minutes. You only use dry rub during the cooking of the meat, and gentlemen eat it just the way it comes off the grill. Serve sauce on the side for everyone else.

Kentucky Style
Mutton, served with "black dip" sauce based on vinegar and Worcestershire Sauce.
I have been unable to find a recipe for it. And there are variations from county to county!

Texas style
Beef. Just beef. Maybe a little "cabrito" (goat).

½ pound Pickling Spices
1 teaspoon Whole Cloves
1 medium Onion, chopped
2 stalks Celery, chopped
36 ounces Catsup
½ cup Chili Sauce
1 quart Water
½ cup Cider Vinegar
1 tablespoon Dry Mustard
½ cup Worcestershire Sauce
½ cup Light Brown Sugar, packed
¼ tablespoon Garlic Powder
Salt to taste
1 tablespoon Tabasco Sauce
2 tablespoons Lemon Juice
Tie pickling spices and cloves loosely in cheesecloth bag. Combine all ingredients in a heavy pot and simmer slowly about 1½ hours. Remove from heat and cool partially. Remove spice bag. Pour mixture into blender and blend until smooth. Cover until ready to serve.

Then there's the issue of Dry and Wet Rubs!

About Dry Rubs
The rub is considered by many to be the central part of the barbecue process. There are two main reasons for using dry rub: the salt should draw the moisture from the surface of the meat, and (though there should not be too much sugar lest it burn and leave a bitter taste) sugar contributes to this drying process, so it shouldn't be eliminated.

There are as many styles of rub as there are barbecue cooks. Ingredients used by many include paprika, cumin, garlic powder, onion powder, black pepper, cayenne pepper, chile powder, oregano, sage, and many more.

Rub is usually applied the night before smoking, and sometimes up to three days ahead. Rubs are better than marinades for large pieces of meat such as briskets and pork butts. The fat is sufficient to permeate the meat and keep it moist. Drawing out excess moisture from the outside portion of large cuts helps make a flavorful and attractive crust considered by purists to be far too good to sully with sauce.

Wayne's "Quick & Dirty" BBQ Sauce
(You know I had to get one of mine in here!)
This one is good when you need a sauce quickly.

Catsup (about half the volume of the sauce you want to make)
Dark Brown Sugar (a good bit — how sweet do you want it?) (Equal® works almost as well)
Dark Molasses (1-3 tablespoons for a cup of sauce)
Vietnamese Sriracha Hot Sauce (about half as much as there is catsup)

Mix it all together with a fork or your finger and serve it … you will get compliments!
(Note: a semi-clean finger is preferred! Sorry, guys, that's the way I cook.)
Makes just one meal worth, or enough to choke a horse, depending.

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