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Area_Man's Post-Apocalyptic Hot Sauce

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Area_Man's Post-Apocalyptic Hot Sauce

area_man | Dec 22, 2011 10:18 AM

Recently put up a batch of this one. I call it Post Apocalyptic because I think you only really need one batch to get through the rest of your life.

180 habanero peppers
5 pounds of jalapeno peppers
1 pound of Winco bulk ground red hot chili pepper
1 pound of Winco bulk ground dried Poblano peppers
1 gallon white vinegar
1 half-gallon of mango nectar
1 can of crushed pineapple

The reason I say 180 habaneros rather than giving a weight to the amount is because so much of the time I find that retail grocery stores have moldy, freezer burned, bruised, or otherwise rotten peppers. I have to call the produce department and ask for them to order a couple bags for me (90 ct each). Still, this last time I wound up with about a quart and a half out of the original 180 that were not food quality. Since I promptly picked up my order, promptly used them, and promptly called to ask for an exchange, I was able to drive over to the local market and trade my peppers for a third bag that also contained numerous "winners" to pick through. I think in the end I probably wound up with about 180 usable peppers, so I'm not crying too much. At 25c a pepper though, I wasn't in the mood to torch off $22 when I still had to go back to the same store to buy replacement peppers anyway...

I'm not sure the retailer would want me to name them, so I'll leave it at that. They made good on their product so I'm happy enough but would rather deal with a retailer that did a little better of a job at QC on their own.

No comment on the rest of the ingredients as they are easy to obtain, assuming you have a Winco nearby or some other store that sells these ingredients in bulk. At first I tried grinding up dried Poblanos in a food processor but had time consuming, noisy, lenghthy, and in the end unsatisfactory results. I'm not sure whether the pre-crushed Poblanos were cheaper but I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to buy them again.

To make a short story short again, set out 14 quart-sized canning jars in the top rack of your dishwasher, simmer 14 caps, and have 14 screw-on lids ready.

Slice your 5# of Jalapenos however you like. You might even want to go so far as to run them through a food processor if you think that will make your sauce hotter, or remove the seeds to cool it off a little.

Equally distribute the crushed and dried pepper mixes in each quart.

Pack 13 habaneros in each quart.

Distribute the jalapenos equally

Add the crushed pineapple and mango juice equally

Top off with vinegar to appropriate canning height for your jars

Process for 90 minutes according to applicable directions available from Ball Canning and the USDA.

I found that not all the peppers burst during processing. To make each jar a bit more uniform as I opened them for use, I took a whisk and spun it in the jar, breaking up the peppers and catching the skins on the whisk. I just used the skins first, and then enjoyed the rest of the pepper sauce as desired.

Costs:
Habaneros - $45
Jalapenos - $15
Crushed red - $4
Poblanos - $8
Pineapple - $2
Mango juice - $4
Vinegar - $1
---------------------------

$79 for ingredients, $10 for propane, and I already had everything else, so $80 for 32oz x 14 = about 20c and ounc. This kind of pepper sauce typically retails for about $4-5 an ounce (ounce and a quarter, ounce and a half) so this is probably a good money saver as well.

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