Chowhound

It’s hard to believe that August is here and fall is just around the corner. We’ve barely made a dent in our hot weather supply of rosé and some of you people are already talking about Halloween, Thanksgiving flights, and Pumpkin Spice Lattes. Stop the madness!

As a way to protest the winding down of summer months, we’re going to continue eating and drinking the foods and bevs that have defined June and July’s thriving dining scene. Chowhound Executive Editor Carleigh Connelly sat down with the folks at Cheddar to discuss the popularity of three specific trends and why they’re worth your time and money.

Check out the clip here, as well as a breakdown of what was discussed below.

Filipino Food

Chowhound

Whether it’s bright purple ube, spicy sisig, or the coveted chicken adobo, there’s no denying that filipino food is making a big impact on the culinary world. In fact, many LA and NY-based restaurants are dedicating entire menus to the Spanish, Malaysian, Chinese, Japanese, Indian, and American-inspired cuisine. Google searches for “filipino food” have doubled since 2012 and the range of ingredients and proteins, from noodles and rice to pork and chicken, means there is a dish for everyone. 

Charcoal-Dyed Everything

Little Damage Ice Cream Shop

In direct protest to the rainbow unicorn craze, many establishments have incorporated activated charcoal into their recipes. Sure, there is something entertaining about drinking or eating something that’s dyed black, but it also has a bevy of health benefits including detoxification and hangover curing abilities. That being said, anything with charcoal is more fun going in than coming out. Does everyone remember the infamous black bun Whopper? Not a good time.

Chilled Red Wine

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Who says you can’t drink your red wine and chill it too? Someone who’s never heard of Lambrusco, that’s who. The Italian, effervescent wine has become a Happy Hour staple for easy sip-seeking winos. Just be sure it isn’t too cold. When a wine is chilled below 50 degrees, its flavor is masked by the lower temperature. The more you know.

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