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Prickly chayotes gone wild

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Home Cooking 8

Prickly chayotes gone wild

rworange | Oct 9, 2006 08:27 PM

So last year Roberto trotted in with two little chayotes he found growing in the yard.

This year the chayote has gone mad, covering the fence with at least a bushel of the fruit and hundreds of little white flowers that promise lots more.

It is sort of kudzu-like. I can no longer see the lilac bush, the small peach trees and it is advancing on the yuzu tree. It's getting pretty close to the door too. I've starting to get that Audrey of "Little Shop of Horrors" fame feeling. I swear it wasn't there a week ago and I haven't seen the small dog next door lately.

So, how do I eat these? Is there something to do with vast ... vast ... quantities?

I have lots to practice with ... but frankly have never knowingly eaten a chayote. How do I know it is ripe? With the prickly type should there be a lot of prickle?

http://mihuerto.ifrance.com/images/pa...

I read in the links at the end that the leaves and roots can be used ... yeah, especially interested in getting rid of those roots. Anyone used other parts besides the fruit?

The wiki link has lots of alternate names, so it seems to be used world-wide. In France it is called christophene. Other countries
cajot, chocho, choko, chuchu, fuk maew, fut sao gwa, gayota, guiscil, hup jeung gwa ("closed palms squash"), labu siam, mango squash, mirliton, pataste, pipinella, sayote, Seemae BaDhneKayi, su-su, tayote, trai su, vegetable pear, vilati vanga, waluh, AND zucca.

Certainly with all those names, there have to be lots of good uses for these.

Chayote links
http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/chayotes...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chayote

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