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Beer Food Allergies

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?


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Beer, Cider, & Sake Beer Food Allergies

Which USA-domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

sweet100s | | Mar 22, 2014 03:51 PM

Does anyone happen to have already researched which domestic beers contain propylene glycol?

I have developed an allergy to propylene glycol. My reaction that I endured several years ago: the skin on the soles of feet and palms of hand turn into dinosaur skin. Skin gets thickened, then it cracks, bleeds and is very very itchy. It was so painful I started to think of ways that I could convince a doctor to amputate my feet and hands.

Took 9 trips to an uber-expensive dermatologist and diagnoses of psoriasis, ezcema, etc. Nothing helped. Then, I (yes, me, not the doctor) said, "What about an allergy test?" One allergy test + eliminating propylene glycol completely eliminated the problem. In 4 months, perfect skin.

Eliminating propylene glycol is not easy, It's in almost all skin and hair products unless they use the more expensive glycerin. I believe it's an ingredient used as a (what's the word...something that helps maintain the product's desired consistency?) I have seen dog food commercials on TV advertise they no longer put it in their dog food.

Recently, I started feeling the beginnings of the same problem in my feet. I couldn't imagine what it could be since I read every single label for all products I purchase.

Someone forwarded me a link to the Subway bread controversy. A few clicks later I see this:
(ick - it's also an ingredient in antifreeze


Never realized beer could contain propylene glycol. I started drinking mostly lite domestic beers. This could definitely be the source of the problem.

2 of the solutions Ms. Foodbabe suggests I'll be doing in the meantime:
1) Buy organic beers
2) Buy german beers by law they can't have the extra crap in them
but those are probably so much more caloric. Even my favorite domestic lite beer, Sam Adams Light, has 120 calories per, last I checked.

Anyway, I'm wondering if anyone else in the world with adverse reactions to propylene glycol has already made all the phone calls or done the research needed to figure this out?

And if you happen to know of someone who was diagnosed with ezcema or psoriasis, do suggest they get an allergy test. Turns out, the ingredient I was allergic to was present in the $100/tube cream that I was prescribed!