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Restaurants & Bars Greater Boston Area Pizza

Serious, serious pizza

Gabe Handel | | Nov 13, 2000 02:47 PM

I've lived in New England for about fifteen years now, having been a native of Pittsburgh, PA before that. The one thing that I've still not been able to find is a replacement for my absolute favorite pizza on the planet: Vincent's Pizza on Ardmore Boulevard (Forest Hills, PA on the outskirts of Pittsburgh).

If you haven't been to Vincent's, it's going to be hard to visualize the product, much less the actual restaurant (think 60's bar, velvet paintings, smoke, grime, and truck stop, and you'll get close... but not entirely there). Essentially, Vincent turns out an italian pizza with a thin crust under the toppings and a MUCH bigger crust on the edge--it's nicely singed, so there's lots of texture and nutty flavor, but the interior of the crust is very moist and bubbly (almost like foccaccia). Vincent loads the toppings on to the point where one slice is enough for a large meal. Best of all is that this is a pizza that freezes well, and the leftovers are at least as good as the fresh pie, if not better. It's greasy. Very greasy. ...but the grease mingles nicely with the toasted flour under the pizza, and you end up with nice texture and flavor out of that combo.

I've found a few pizzas around here that I really like. Mike's in Davis is a good thin crust cheap eat, as is Cafe Avventura in the Garage in Harvard Square, but neither of them gets the outer crust or the toppings right. Pizzeria Regina's original location turns out a crust that's nearly what I'm looking for, but it's just not big enough at the edges (nor do they heap on the goods the way Vincent does). Unfortunately, a lot of the pizza around here seems to be of the "Town House of Pizza" Greek variety, which doesn't float my boat.

I still haven't made it out to Santarpio's, which I hear is good, but the descriptions I've heard don't offer hope of a match of the Vincent's style. Any ideas, anyone?