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Dry aging question and story.

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Home Cooking

Dry aging question and story.

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nailles | | Nov 18, 2012 04:11 PM

So I recently move to Baltimore and have been charged with Thanksgiving dinner for my family. We are not exactly the biggest turkey fans so I decided to do a standing rib roast. I wasn't having success in finding a good rib roast, one with good marbling, fat cap, and the right size, so I decided to order one from a shop in town that got good recommendations. I wanted leftovers so I ordered a full 7 rib roast, not trimmed. Well, I went to the counter today to pick it up and ask one of the butchers for my order. His eyes went wide and said, "Please, wait here!" He runs back and another guy comes out and introduces himself as the assistant meat manager and says he didn't recognize the name and asked if I shopped there often. I say no, but I heard good things and he goes on to go to say that if ever need anything at all, whether veal kidneys or a pheasant shot that morning or the toes of a golden sloth, just ask for him. It was about the time he was about to start kissing my hand that I started thinking, "don't people order things like this?" Well, I got my answer, when the first guy comes out with the biggest rib roast I've ever seen. It looked like they wrapped butcher paper around a side of cow.

22.5 lbs and $355 later, I seem to have gotten myself a rib roast. I'm not complaining. It's a really, really nice prime cut. I just wasn't expecting it to be that big. I was expecting 15 lbs maybe? Perhaps I should have specified how much I wanted it to weigh, but I didn't. It was only $15.99/lb, so not bad by that metric.

So my question is: I want to freeze some for another occasion. It's just simply too much, even for leftovers, for the number of people I'm having over. Do I cut it now and dry age then freeze? Any recommendations? Thanks!

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