Why not chrome?


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Why not chrome?

MaximRecoil | | Nov 11, 2010 06:42 PM

I've seen griddles that were chrome plated (decorative chrome), but I would think that chrome, especially industrial hard chrome (which is nearly indestructible; this is what the hydraulic pistons on a bucket loader are plated with for example, and most military rifle bores and chambers) would be good for aluminum, copper, steel, or iron cookware.

Copper for example is usually tinned, but the tin wears off eventually, and can't handle high heat. Sometimes a sheet of stainless steel is bonded to it, but stainless steel is a poor conductor and it is "sticky", so even though it is far more durable than tin and can handle high heat, many people still prefer tin because of its better conductivity and better "non-stick" quality.

Chrome on the other hand, has greater thermal conductivity than tin (and far greater than stainless steel), and has a high degree of natural lubricity. This natural lubricity helped alleviate the jamming problem (mostly failures to extract) that early M16 rifles were having in the Vietnam war. By hard chroming the chambers, there was far less friction between the chamber walls and the fired brass cases, allowing easier extraction, thus less jamming. However, I don't know if that would translate to any degree of "non-stick" in cookware; I've never cooked on chrome to find out.

So it seems to me that industrial hard chrome would be a better performer thermally than both tin or stainless steel; far more durable than tin, and at least as durable as stainless steel; might possibly have some degree of "non-stick" due to its natural lubricity; able to handle far higher heat than tin (higher than cookware would ever be subjected to); and unlike tin, metal utensils are no problem for chrome.

Is there something I'm missing? Why isn't anyone making hard chromed copper or aluminum cookware?

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