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The 5 best EVER dessert cookbooks?


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The 5 best EVER dessert cookbooks?

Peter | | Jul 20, 2008 09:13 PM


I'm trying to put together a list of the 5 absolute best dessert cookbooks of all time. Ok, it's doesn't have to be limited to just 5 -- but it does have to be somewhat limited so I'll pretend that 5's the limit.

While I'm a SERIOUS dessert eater, I'm not much of a dessert cookbook expert -- or even especially knowledgeable, but for me, two very recent cookbooks come to mind. One, I think, really should be on the list and the other I'm curious as to what you think:

1. The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz.

Let's face it, there are a few fundamental formats of dessert. One of them (my personal favorite) is ice cream. And as someone who's made ice cream for a good while -- and tried all formats of recipes from all sorts of sources -- I I find this book to be a new go-to ice cream bible. Straightforward and still sophisticated and incredibly informative. I've been waiting for this book my whole life.

2. The Sweet Life by Kate Zuckerman

This one is nowhere near as focused as the one above (it's about a wide variety of desserts -- the author was/is the pastry chef at a high-end NYC restaurant for a decade) but for me, seems to be foolproof. I've made a dozen desserts form it -- many far more complex than things I typically try -- and they all work flawlessly.

Even more important, the book is full of great "why it works this way" type of information that speaks to my preference for "Cooks Illustrated/Best Recipe" type cookbook reading. I like to know why things work so I can improvise and experiment with some sense of impending results.

... so, what do you think of the two books above? What else should join them? I assume there's some sort of "bible" when it comes to cookies. And when it comes to cakes. Is there a pie bible? (there should be!)

Again, I'm looking for a list of 5 books in the end. Ah heck, if it's 7 or 10 that's ok. Of course this is ENTIRELY subjective but that's ok. That's what makes this fun. :)


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