Economy Got You Down? Eat Some Beef Stroganoff

When I’m depressed or stressed, I don’t crave tiny raviolis made of gelatinized ram’s blood suspended on wires above a smoking pillowcase. I crave chocolate chip cookies, refried beans, and lamb pappardelle. I’m the norm.

According to UK-based grocer Tesco, recession sales on comfort foods have shot through the roof, and many of the country’s experimental chefs and fashionable dining establishments have begun retooling menus to place crab cakes, steak, and mac ’n’ cheese front and center. (Bye bye Pop Rocks, foie gras ice cream, and anything that could be construed as “daring.”)

Scott McCoy, general manager of the Stanford Court Hotel in San Francisco, recalled that during the last economic dip (2001), he was managing a hotel whose restaurant was “just getting slaughtered.” He directed chefs to totally revamp the menu with classic cozy dishes no less than 25 years old. “They went back and researched old menus, and put beef stroganoff on there, and it was great!” says McCoy. (Stanford Court’s Aurea restaurant, incidentally, offers grilled cheese sandwiches and tomato soup.)

Mmmmmmm, beef stroganoff. Yeah, you know you want it now. Well, here are some places that serve it. If your city isn’t on the list, just wait.

La Dijonaise, Culver City, California
“They do great things with gravy and stewy things, and potatoes.” -Chowhound Cinnamon

The Highlander, Atlanta, Georgia
“The Highlander has some of the best bar food in Atlanta.”
-AccessAtlanta.com

Spork, San Francisco, California
“Spork is located in an old KFC location. The name is a tongue in cheek reference to the prior occupant.” -Chowhound

Caldera Public House, Portland, Oregon
“The beef stroganoff is one of the best in town. Reasonable prices, good food, nice folk.” -Portland Citysearch

Red Rooster Wine Bar and Café, Chicago, Illinois
“Very reasonable rustic French and BYOB.” -Chowhound Chicago Mike

Delicatessen, New York, New York
“Famished-looking models lounge around white Formica tabletops, nibbling hesitantly on bits of vulcanized pastrami.” -New York Magazine

See more articles
Share this article: