Techniques for Great Braising

There are lots of ways to make great braised meats, and hounds employ variations on basic techniques depending on their preferences and the results they want.

The basic method starts by searing the meat, then adding liquid. They should come part way up the depth of the meat, not submerge it. If it is cooked in a Dutch oven with a tight-fitting lid at a steady temperature, the meat will cook evenly, even if not turned. Many do turn the meat, though, so that both sides will be exposed to the braising liquid and so it won't stick. valerie spoons some of the braising liquid over the meat periodically, which is a good option when braising large roasts.

Braised foods taste even better a day or two after cooking, and some hounds make them in advance and chill the dish overnight to reheat and serve the next day. c oliver cooks the day before, removes the meat from the liquid and refrigerates the two separately. "I can then easily lift off the congealed fat which is hard to do if the meat is in the liquid," she says. valerie slices braised brisket, lays it in a clean Dutch oven, covers with the sauce, and refrigerates.

There are many methods of creating a sauce from the braising liquid. Straining out the vegetables and reducing the liquid concentrates its flavors and makes an elegant sauce. If you wish to thicken the liquid, you can purée some or all of the vegetables and mix them into the liquid, or simply purée it all together in the pot, using a hand blender. Or thicken the liquid using a cornstarch or arrowroot slurry or a beurre manie (equal parts flour and butter kneaded together). "The beurre manie just adds that extra touch from the butter," thinks jcattles.

Discuss: A Few Questions Beyond the Braising Basics

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