Use Your Brine

There’s a veritable renaissance of retro home arts these days. People are knitting, sewing, baking, and—pickling!

Once upon a time, people pickled veggies to preserve the bounty of their summer gardens. Now, despite what some folks say, everyone from upscale restaurants to adventurous home cooks to people hungry for a taste of home seems to be sterilizing Mason jars and creating salty, tart treats. Not to mention the pickle intrigue generated by this New York Times story.

Molly Wizenberg, of the well-loved food blog Orangette, is getting married. Her beloved is somewhat of a freak for vinegar, which, naturally, has drawn the two of them together in the pursuit of pickles. Her heartfelt paean to pickles, her husband-to-be, and the joy of preparing vats of pickles for her wedding appears on the Kitchen Window section of the NPR website.

Our home kitchen often moonlights as a small-scale pickling plant. The smell of hot brine can make you cough at first, but once you get accustomed, it’s kind of intoxicating. On the right man, it makes a lovely cologne.

With stunning generosity, she shares one of her best wedding presents—top-secret recipes for pickled grapes and pickled prunes from Seattle’s Boat Street restaurant—with anyone who drops by to read the article.

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