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Double Cheese and Black Bread Terrine

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6 to 8 servings
Total: Active:
2 Ratings 

Ingredients (6)

  • 2 sticks (8 ounces) butter
  • 8 ounces Roquefort
  • 1 cup chopped filberts (hazelnuts)
  • 8 ounces Camembert, rind removed
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 4 slices black (rye) bread
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Nutritional Information
  • Calories787
  • Fat64.07g
  • Saturated fat33.51g
  • Trans fat1.24g
  • Carbs36.49g
  • Fiber4.34g
  • Sugar16.38g
  • Protein21.88g
  • Cholesterol142.5mg
  • Sodium1173.7mg
  • Nutritional Analysis per serving (6 servings) Powered by

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Double Cheese and Black Bread Terrine

This terrine is always a great success. You can make it the evening before, but do not slice it until just before serving. If there are more of you, just add a third layer!

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Instructions

  1. 1In the bowl of a food processor, blend together half the butter with the Roquefort, then add the filberts. Proceed in the same way to make a similar mixture with the Camembert, raisins, and the remaining butter.
  2. 2Line a loaf pan with plastic wrap. Cut up the black bread and use to line the base of the pan.
  3. 3Spread a layer of the Roquefort mixture on the bread base.
  4. 4Add a second layer of bread, then spread with the Camembert mixture. The loaf pan will be only a third or half full, but that will be sufficient for the number of guests indicated. Chill in a refrigerator for 1 to 2 hours.
  5. 5Before serving, turn out and cut into thin slices, and serve with a salad.

Other combinations are possible:
Muenster cheese with cumin or caraway seeds or even Gorgonzola with dried apricots or prunes.

Beverage pairing: Williams & Humbert Dry Sack Sherry, Spain. The terrine is rich and savory, but not really sweet except for the little nuggets of raisins. Consequently, a wine pairing should be have some nuttiness to meet the filberts and Camembert, but not necessarily as sweet as a tawny port. Off-dry amontillado is always a good bet, and Dry Sack is one of the classics of this style.

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