Home Cooking

It takes 3 days

Share:

Live your best food life.

Sign up to discover your next favorite restaurant, recipe, or cookbook in the largest community of knowledgeable food enthusiasts.
Sign Up For Free
Home Cooking 5

It takes 3 days

Mrs. Smith | Feb 16, 2006 01:00 AM

Hi everyone,

So I bought these cute little 2-pound bags of King Arthur Artisan Organic All-Purpose Flour.

And I was sucked in by the enticing baguette recipe on the back.

And it takes 3 days! I mean, I've heard of the overnight sponge (biga), but three days seemed a little ridiculous.

But I was wrong, and KA is oh, so right.

It's not just the flavor of these baguettes (yes, they taste like the ones in France) but the texture is AMAZING.

The outsied is smoother, harder, crisper, but somehow easier to eat (how can that be?) than any baguette I've ever eaten.

The shape, from the repeated rising and the retardation done in the refrigerator, is truly cylindrical and even (I used a baguette pan, but they rose more evenly in it than any other recipe I've used).

I used Marion Cunningham's recipe in the Fanny Farmer Baking book for years and years and still love it, but that bread, though good, looks a bit like amateur night in comparison to these long-rising beauties.

I've yet to pit it against Rose Levy Berenbaum's baguette recipe from The Bread Bible, which takes a paltry 48 hours (ha!). While I revere the great RLB, I wonder if hers can measure up.

My only critique of these baguette wonders is that they could use just a touch more salt, perhaps a 1/4 teaspoon total in the dough for 2 baguettes, which I will be trying next. But I'm almost loathe to mess with this amazing recipe.

Anybody tried it, or The Bread Bible baguette recipe? Comments? I'd love to hear. I won't be making any non-sponge simple-dough baguettes again any time soon.

Want to stay up to date with this post?

Recommended From Chowhound