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"Stuffing" Steak With Good Cheese - What're Your Do's and Don'ts

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"Stuffing" Steak With Good Cheese - What're Your Do's and Don'ts

shaogo | Feb 15, 2010 05:53 AM

Went to Di Palo's in NYC and went crazy buying cheeses.

When I got back I had a couple of lovely, very well-marbled but small Sirloin Strip Steaks that were crying out "eat me!" I butterflied the steaks (they started at 1.5" thick) and slathered the inside with a mixture of butter, Pecorino and Gorgonzola. Perhaps it was Divine guidance (I'll explain later) but after I'd stuffed the steaks, I seasoned with pepper and was called away from the kitchen for 45 minutes or so. I left the stuffed steaks on the counter.

I cooked the steaks on a griddle pan at just a slightly higher temp than I cook eggs, and browned some onions and mushrooms next to the steaks. The first side I thought was a little over-cooked so I toned it down on the second side.

Well, after letting the cooked steaks rest for fifteen minutes I sliced 'em up. They looked incredible; one side vivid pink, the other pink with grey, with a vivid white line in the middle where the cheese goes through. Even better than the appearance, the flavor that the meat absorbed from the cheeses -- just in that 45 minutes I was away from the kitchen -- was amazing!

Here's what I'm asking for help with:

The cheeses squished rapidly out from in-between the layers of steak, despite the fact that only one side of the butterfly was open. We had to chase the cheese around our plates with hunks of the steak. The second time I made this dish, I omitted the butter, just using the cheeses, grated, and added a bit of garlic that I'd mellowed in olive oil. Waited an hour to "marinate" with the cheese, this time. Same thing, of course; the cheeses looked great upon presentation but then everything went downhill after we started eating. The cheese, this time, formed gloopy mounds around the plate, amidst the onions/mushrooms. Nonetheless, the flavor was magnificent.

One friend suggested binding the cheeses with a tight Bechamel. But that would dilute the great cheesy/beefy taste going on with yet a "creamy" kinda thing going on. The cheeses, while to the eye unappealing, are just creamy enough on their own.

Other than letting steaks sit in the cheese for flavor, then scraping it off, and serving grilled steaks with cheese sauce, what're your ideas to develop this dish? Anyone have recipes involving steak with Romano cheese (I know there'll probably be Gorgonzola steak recipes)? Roll it, tie it and roast it?

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