+
Home Cooking

Best Ever Scrambled Eggs

crt | Nov 10, 200704:05 PM     9

Okay. I have posted this same subject in several of the 'scrambled eggs' topics. But I thought I'd start a topic with it becuase when you come in late on a topic many people may not ever really read your suggestion. Besides when I had posted it, I actually hadn't tried the technique called for in the article in which I found it. I did the day after, and I have to tell you they were the best tasting scrambled eggs I've ever made. I've never even had them made like this from a restaurant. If your are one of those who likes air filled dried or rubbery curds of scrambled eggs, then this technique is not for you. If, however, you like your eggs moist and delicious then this is the technique for you! Read on...

Most American cooks treat eggs like a red headed stepchild. They over beat/work them...they use too much heat (when cooking them in a pan)...and or they cook them too long. Results...really bad scrambled eggs that are dry, rubbery, flavorless, or so puffy the curds remind you of popcorn. For great scrambled eggs you just need basically two ingredients...EGGS & BUTTER! Forget all those tips like adding milk...water...flour etc. etc. Eggs are one of the most delicate of foods and should be treated with tender loving care. I learned all this from Julia Child when I caught an episode from the series of Julia & Jacques [Pepin] Cooking At Home. It was reinforced when I found this article "The Technique: The Perfect Scramble. Most scramble eggs suck. These don't." n a 2003 edition of GQ magazine I was thumbing through while waiting, where else, in the doctors office. Here goes...'Slow-Cooked Scrambled Eggs: Serves 2. 2 tablespoons butter 6 eggs. Salt and pepper. 1) In a nonstick pan over low heat, melt the butter. Then crack the eggs directly into the pan. Let them sit for about 30 seconds. Season with salt and pepper [I part from this and season when plated] and then with a rubber spatula, split the yolks. Every now and then, slowly message the eggs around the pan. Don't overdo it - you want to keep the whites white and the yolks yellow. If you want to add cheese or herbs, do it while the eggs are still wet. 2) The eggs are done when they are still tender but not overly runny - just this side of underdone. This should take about two minutes. Serve with your favorite/usual 'breakfast' meal sides.

Want to stay up to date with this post? Sign Up Now ›

More from Chowhound

How to Navigate Cheap Wine and Score the Perfect Bottle
Guides

How to Navigate Cheap Wine and Score the Perfect Bottle

by Amy Schulman | There is no shortage of cheap wine in this world, but if you want good cheap wine, there are a few...

15 Creamy Soup Recipes for Warding Off Cold Winter Weather
Recipe Round-Ups

15 Creamy Soup Recipes for Warding Off Cold Winter Weather

by Jen Wheeler | Is there anything more perfect than a steamy bowl of soup to fortify you on a bone-chilling winter...

5 Icons of the French Pastry Case That'll Make You Say J'Adore
Guides

5 Icons of the French Pastry Case That'll Make You Say J'Adore

by Patty Lee | The pastry case at a French bakery can hold a dizzying array of baked goods. There are breads, cakes...

How to Feel Right at Home at a Fancy Restaurant
Guides

How to Feel Right at Home at a Fancy Restaurant

by Pamela Vachon | If you're not accustomed to fancy restaurants and are nervous about exactly how to act or what to...

Get fresh food news delivered to your inbox

Sign up for our newsletter to receive the latest tips, tricks, recipes and more, sent twice a week.