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Melanie Wong | Apr 27, 202004:23 PM     2

At Saturday morning's Santa Rosa Original Certified Farmers Market, I picked up a bunch of this purple-red leafed, green-stemmed Chinese brassica grown by Sebastopol's Singing Frog Farm. When I asked the name, I was told it's called "red bok choy". Since a direct translation of "bok choy" would be white-vegetable, I was amused. Looking through images from seed catalogs, I've only found variants of the same. So I'm asking here for any other common names or better yet, the Chinese name, for this vegetable.

I blanched it for 60 seconds, then stir-fried over high heat, and drizzled with a little bit of oyster sauce. Sadly, the leaves did not retain that color and changed to completely green. The cooking water was dyed a beautiful emerald green. The stems are fairly tender and non-fibrous. No bitterness, but a tinge more earthy character than Shanghai cabbages (aka qing cai).

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