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Mouthfeel: the effect of sensation and texture on the flavor of food

Melanie Wong | Jun 4, 201709:31 PM

" . . . Yes, most people know that if you add a vanilla flavor, you feel it's creamier, even though it may not be. It is related to the experience you have earlier that we call it binding. A lot of the talk nowadays about taste is interpreted by processes in the brain. There's even a new field of science called neurogastronomy that reflects on the neuro-processes related to the way you perceive food. Quite often in the brain, we bind different things together. If we have an experience that vanilla and creaminess belong together, then we meet vanilla in another context, we attempt to interpret it in the sense that it's creamy, even though it may be less creamy than it actually is. In this way, previous experiences and expectations frame the way we experience the taste of food. . ."

Mouthfeel: the effect of sensation and texture on the flavor of food

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