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Cookware

Tell me about your induction unit(s) and experiences

drrayeye | Mar 7, 201912:28 AM     14

One uses the term "induction cooking" in the United States to refer to two quite different kinds of cooking with two quite different devices: 1. the plug in single hob, and 2. the stovetop.

The plug in single hob has at least some software control modalities (usually both energy and temperature), with costs ranging from about $30 to $1800 or more.

Induction stovetops tend to be configured much like electric stovetops--with energy modes but no temperature mode--sometimes as few as 10 levels. They often have a superpower switch of one kind or another. Since they and refrigerators are typically powered by double the voltage of plug in units, that superpower switch can transform certain cooking tasks. There are high end versions of stovetops with beds of coils and sensors, but most have the same doughnut coil--just different sizes. Prices range from about $2000 to as much as $8000 or more.

Indicate which type of unit you are using (plug in vs. stovetop), what you use it for, and how it's changed your cooking since you started using it. Make special mention if you are using it as a commercial unit. Please add more detail and correct my description for your unit as necessary. Please correct my description for your unit.

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