Holiday Sweepstakes: You Could Win* a KitchenAid 7-Qt. Pro Line Stand Mixer and More! Enter the Giveaway

Follow us:

+
Cookware 242

Feedback on your new Fissler/Paderno/Silga

damiano | Jan 16, 201812:55 AM

A few of us here have recently jumped on deals on Fissler original profi, Paderno 1100 Grand Gourmet, and/or Silga Teknika pots and pans. Now that there are more people using these, I'm eager to learn about your experiences!

These three lines all have an aluminum disc bottom of at least 6mm - a thickness currently not available in full-clad alternatives. This will offer very even heat, but the trade-off includes having less conductive stainless steel sidewalls.

Bottom-line: do you feel comfortable recommending these?

It would help to specify which pot you bought, if you cook on gas/induction etc, and perhaps these 4 questions might offer some lines of thought.

1) How do you like its fit and finish, handles, any quality issues etc?
2) What don't you like about them?
3) What are the pros and cons compared to other cookware in your kitchen, including straight copper, (enameled) cast iron, full-clad etc? Think responsiveness vs even heat, its price point etc.
4) How do you use them? Are there specific recipes where you now solely use the Fissler/Paderno/Silga? Do they shine or fail in techniques like slow cooking, braising, frying, poaching, boiling etc?

----------------------------------------------------------

This discussion is bound to touch on the merits and drawbacks of all disc bottom cookware, so if you want to share your experience using e.g. copper-based pots like the Demeyere Atlantis, or cheap restaurant grade sauce pans, or whatever you have or had in your kitchen, please be so kind. Or if you are considering say a Demeyere Atlantis, why?

Kaleo has highlighted the problems smaller sized disc bottom pots may encounter when using gas and where the disc does not extend all the way to the sides - are there any other issues, or unexpected positive surprises?

+ Are there any shapes or sizes where you'd never choose disc bottom (e.g. sauciers because of lack of responsiveness, or smaller sized pots on gas)? Or where you'd always choose disc bottom (stock pots)?
+ Are there specific recipes or cooking techniques where you absolutely miss or don't miss having conductive sidewalls?
+ Are we missing anything in this discussion?

Thanks.

Want to stay up to date with this post? Sign Up Now ›

Recommended from Chowhound

Catch up on the latest activity across all community discussions.
View latest discussions