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Gardening

Bug-Killing Potato Plants?

Querencia | May 9, 200908:55 PM     4

Last night I was reading "The Botany of Desire" by Michael Pollan (2002). Pollan describes a genetically-engineered potato plant that has leaves with a natural toxin so that when potato bugs munch on the leaves they immediately get sick and fall over dead. He wrote that seven years ago and I don't know how long NewLeaf potatoes had been around before that but I got to wondering whether there might be something in the potatoes that could do harm to human potato eaters. So tonight I googled "NewLeaf potato" and found enough material to keep me busy for a week. Apparently Monsanto suppressed, for years, studies showing changes to the intestinal tissues of rats that ate the potatoes. Are people still growing these potatoes? Does anyone here have gardening experience with NewLeaf potatoes? Just curious; my apartment balcony accommodates geraniums but not potatoes.

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