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Home Cooking

Brining an already salt injected frozen turkey?

beckster914 | Nov 20, 200908:18 PM     27

I was planning on using Alton Brown's turkey recipe this year which includes brining and then roasting. I moved my turkey today from the freezer to the fridge to defrost for a few days and noticed it is injected with a salt solution. I am wondering if it's still okay to brine this or will it come out too salty? I know you need to rinse the salt off after brining so not sure if this is okay. Should I use less salt or not brine at all? This is my first year trying to brine so I have no clue. The turkey was a free one from my grocery store from spending so much, so I suppose I could still buy one without the salt injection. What do you guys think?

By the way, it is a Riverside young turkey and it says it is moistness enhanced by injection w/ approximately 8% solution of: turkey broth, salt, sodium phosphates, sugar & flavoring.

HELP!!! I need to buy the brining bag, container, and spices this weekend if I am gonna do this...

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