Home Cooking

Ice Cream

Adventures with a busted ice cream maker (long)

Share:

Live your best food life.

Sign up to discover your next favorite restaurant, recipe, or cookbook in the largest community of knowledgeable food enthusiasts.
Sign Up For Free
Home Cooking 9

Adventures with a busted ice cream maker (long)

AnneInMpls | Feb 8, 2006 01:00 AM

Discovered in the basement: A never-been-opened ice cream maker, Krups La Glaciere (4-cup capacity). No one remembers buying it, and we're not sure how long it has been lurking there. (3-5 years, perhaps?) Krups no longer makes this model (#337), so I've included a link to one on eBay, which has a picture showing how the bowl sits on the base.

Great excitement followed our discovery, as we have been craving something new and tasty in the frozen-dessert realm. But our hopes were cruelly dashed after a few tries.

We froze the insulated bowl for 10 hours, then attempted to make some Grapefruit-Cointreau sorbet (see recipe below). No luck. Not even a hint of freezing. One of us wondered if the booze was interfering with the freezing action, but the other didn't think there was enough booze to make a difference. So the mixture went into a shallow glass pie plate in the freezer, and made glorious slush. (We were too impatient to wait for it to freeze completely.)

Back to the freezer for the bowl, for another 30+ hours. We could still hear some sloshing when the bowl was shaken, but we were full of hope. So we decided to make the Lemon-Buttermilk Sorbet recipe from Epicurious.

When we poured the mixture into the bowl, the sides frosted ever so slightly. The paddle started to show evidence of slush after five minutes. After 15 minutes, the mixture was pretty cold, but there was no longer any evidence of freezing. After 20 minutes of processing, the mixture started to warm up again. Investigation showed that the base of the maker was quite hot, and was heating up the bottom of the bowl, thus warming up the mixture.

Much weeping and gnashing of teeth ensued, after which we each had a small glass of the liquid mixture (it was yummy, but too rich as a beverage). Then we poured the rest into our well-used pie plate and put it into the freezer for tomorrow.

Three questions:

- Do I have a bad unit? Is it normal for the base of the unit to heat up a lot?

- Should I have chilled the buttermilk-lemon mixture for a few hours before processing? All the ingredients were straight out of the fridge (except the sugar), so I was hoping to avoid a delay. Was this a mistake?

- Assuming a "yes" to my first question, what should I buy to replace this ice cream maker? I want something reliable, easy to use, small (my freezer isn't very big), and not too expensive. I'll be making mostly sorbets and low-fat frozen confections. (I can get wonderful, super-premium, high-fat ice cream just down the street; and besides, our cholesterol is too high anyway.)

Thanks,
Anne

P.S.

On the positive side, our first two mixtures show great promise. This one is great as a granita, frozen in a glass pie plate. (It also makes a wonderful drink, if it comes to that!)

Grapefuit-Cointreau Sorbet

I used pink Texas Rio Star grapefruits - organic ones from my co-op - because they're beautifully sweet right now.

2 cups freshly-squeezed grapefruit juice (about 2 large grapefruits)
1/4 cup light honey (adjust amount to taste)
2-3 Tbsp Cointreau

Warm the honey gently, then stir in a few tablespoons of grapefruit juice. Combine with the rest of the juice and add the Cointreau. Freeze in an ice-cream maker per directions. Or pour into a shallow pan and freeze for a few hours, then scrape with a fork and mix before serving.

Link: http://cgi.ebay.com/KRUPS-LA-GLACIERE...

Want to stay up to date with this post?

Recommended From Chowhound