Some dismiss George Foreman grills, saying it’s just as easy to cook something up in a pan, or complaining that they’re difficult to clean. But plenty of hounds love them for speedy cooking of certain kinds of foods, and have strategies for making cleanup easier.

They’re great for quick cooking of burgers, chicken breasts, salmon steaks, sausages, and marinated vegetables. They’re also perfect for panini (or any grilled sandwich) and quesadillas. Bone-in meats don’t work well, as they don’t cook evenly. Since Foreman grills are angled so that fat and juices will run off as meats cook, leaner cuts work best unless your aim is to lose some of the fat. And while some like Foreman grills for cooking chops, others feel they’re not good for red meat beyond burgers, since they don’t get hot enough to produce a good sear.

The basic, entry-level Foreman grill has permanently attached grill plates, and can be difficult to clean. But many say that cleaning is no problem so long as you do it while the plates are still warm. Some simply use a damp sponge, while others find that sticking a few layers of dampened paper towels in the closed grill after it’s been turned off makes cleaning easy later on. Jacquilynne shares this tip: putting a sheet of parchment paper on either side of the food you’re cooking has minimal effect on its browning, but leaves almost no mess behind to clean up.

A larger, newer version has removable grill plates that are immersible and dishwasher safe.

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