The Fat of Your Choice

For cooking, there’s more to choose from than just butter or Crisco; there’s also duck fat, goose fat, bacon grease, and, of course, lard.

For many bakers, lard is the shortening of choice. Good lard makes a lovely biscuit or pie crust. There’s a difference in lard quality, you ask? Of course. The quality of lard depends on how the fat was rendered. The pure white supermarket lard is not great; it’s been processed and hydrogenated, says JMF. A Mexican grocer is a fine place to buy good lard; if you’re lucky, they’ll have made it themselves. It’ll be a tan color, and retain a bacony flavor. The best lard is called “leaf lard,” and comes from around the hog’s kidneys. It doesn’t have that porky flavor; it’s clean.

Karl S notes that some markets will carry fresh geese during the Jewish New Year and Chanukah. You can get about a quart of goose fat from cooking just one goose. It’s better than duck fat, he says.

Save your bacon and poultry fat for cooking. All of them will keep a long time in the fridge, and they also freeze well.

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Lard–to use or not to use? [moved from Home Cooking]

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