Cookware

Wedgwood or Apilco?

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Wedgwood or Apilco?

sueatmo | Jan 16, 2014 03:49 PM

A couple or three years ago I asked fellow Hounds about stainless tableware. My question resulted in a lot of useful information, for which I remain grateful. When I chose my pattern I felt quite pleased with my choice, and I continue to use it daily with pleasure.

Now I need a set of white dinnerware. Over the last several years I have collected a few nice solid white serving pieces. I have Limoges, Bavarian, Meakin, and a newer British piece plus several platters of various sorts. In others words it is an eclectic group, but all in solid white.

I want a nicer set of white dinnerware, preferable porcelain or fine china, that I can use for nice occasions and also for casual gatherings. I don't do fancy dinner parties; dinner at my house is usually casual. I started looking for white dishes awhile back, and now, it appears I will have some actual money to spend! So, the search has become much more serious.

I narrowed it down to 2. Apilco Tuileries at W-S http://tinyurl.com/q6vhf67 ,

and Wedgwood White http://tinyurl.com/pjrglhf

I like the Apilco very well, but I adore the Wedgwood. Advantages to the Apilco seem to be durability. Reviews praise this. I think it is handsome but I am not fond of the cup style. However it seems well suited to my needs.

I don't know what the advantage to the Wedgwood would be. I don't even know what sort of dish is it. It is referred to as "fine china" and "whiteware". Do any of you know what whiteware is?

So, if any of you use Wedgwood or Apilco, I'd like to know how it has performed for you. This is important to me, because my Pfaltzgraff dinnerware bought about 14 years ago (made in America) has performed poorly. It has not broken so much as discolored and chipped. The discoloration is the most distressing.

Both of these patterns are dishwashable, which is major as far as I'm concerned.

Thanks in advance.

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