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Los Angeles Area Cinco de Mayo Tacos

Titos vs. Cinco de Mayo: Tale of 2 Tacos


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Restaurants & Bars Los Angeles Area Cinco de Mayo Tacos

Titos vs. Cinco de Mayo: Tale of 2 Tacos

sassille | | Jul 19, 2006 09:03 PM

Since we had the discussion recently about the charms of Tito’s versus Cinco de Mayo next door, we decided to donate our palates to science and endure the challenge of taste-testing a taco from each of the adjoining stands. Titos’ is a 39 year old landmark compared to Cinco de Mayo which was formerly Lucy’s about 2 years ago. I occasionally eat at both places since they are in the neighborhood. We ordered 1 beef taco with cheese from each. Prices were equal., quantity and quality of filling were indiscernible. The salsas were equally spicy but Tito’s had more texture. Cinco de Mayo’s was soupier with little flakes of fresh cilantro in it. The major difference lies in the tacos shells. Cinco de Mayo’s was fried with the hint of oil on the exterior of the shell. It was curled around the edges and had a blistery texture from the deep fryer. Health food? This ain’t it! They wrap the taco in foil and plastic if you buy it to go, so beware, it gets soggy from the retained heat. Try to eat it hot from the kitchen.
Tito’s gives true meaning to the term hard-shell taco. With no sign of oil and very little flavor it leads one to ponder whether it may have been fried at all. They’re like Taco Bell pre-fab shells, but about 50% thicker. It had a cardboard like appearance, looking like it came out of a vending machine.
Cinco wins for thin crispy chips. Tito’s chips looked to be hand cut, but were stiffer, thicker and took some extra effort to chew. Their tortillas tasted like they sat out on the counter overnight before frying. My preference will be Cinco de Mayo for resembling more of a taco like abuelita used to make.