Restaurants & Bars

Boston Area

the new Terramia

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Restaurants & Bars

the new Terramia

MC Slim JB | Jul 2, 2004 03:38 PM

Have heard that a new chef has made this place worth revisiting; I loved it in the Mario Nocera era, gradually became disenchanted with subsequent lieutentants or replacements, haven't been back in a couple of years. A table for an 8pm reservation was ready on time, always a welcome sign in a neighborhood where most places don't deign to accept reservations, and many that do treat them cavalierly.

Terramia now seems to have been repositioned as a seafood-oriented place, e.g., every pasta but one, and perhaps two-thirds of the entrees, centered on fish or shellfish. The famous lobster fritters are still on the menu, though I didn't order them: I think of them as lobster doughnuts, kind of sweet. Instead, we went for an antipasto special, quite Tuscan in content, very good and very hefty. On the heels of a good white bean spread tinged pink with perhaps sun-dried tomatoes, flecked with red pepper flakes, and swimming in good EVOO, we realized we had over-ordered, and cancelled one of our salads.

We kept the Caprese, which had exceptional tomatoes for this time of year. Two pastas to finish: a lovely bolognese with obviously homemade pasta, and a linguine vongole with a ton of (possibly grilled) clams in the shell, a truly stellar version of this rather cliched North End dish.

My beloved found a Vino Nobile di Montepulciano for $36, one of the few bargains on the wine list. About $110 with tax. Excellent service on a full weeknight. Overall, I don't think it quite hits the heights of the early days, but this kitchen iteration is much improved over my last visit. I can't imagine it tearing us away from Sage or Prezza or Bricco or Antico Forno or Carmen very often, but I'm glad it has rebounded.

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