Restaurants & Bars


Momo duel round two - Gurkha Cafe and Kailash Momo - Plumstead, London


More from Restaurants & Bars

Restaurants & Bars U.K./Ireland

Momo duel round two - Gurkha Cafe and Kailash Momo - Plumstead, London

JFores | | Dec 24, 2012 04:49 AM

I'll cover both of these in one post as we only got momo at Gurkha Cafe. The meal at Kailash Momo was much larger and it can be confirmed that the restaurant is authentically Tibetan. Not even Nepalese, actually Tibetan.

Food wise the momo at Gurkha Cafe had a considerably thicker and more dough-ey flavor and consistency than those found at De Namaste. The filling was meatier, but less juicy and overtly spiced than comparable momo at D'N. The momo soup here was by far the best that I had at any of the places sampled. Really tasty with a certain tartness that I keep encountering in Nepalese food and a richer more oily broth. Overall great, but the momo are different and I sort of prefer D'Namase on them. Overall winner on the soup though. The absolute best of the best for momo ko achar so far too (the sauce.)

We had a follow up meal at Kailash Momo which covered a wider range of dishes. Chicken momo were distinctly different with Chinese style half-moon dumpling casings. I have had this shape in New York, but this was the first time I encountered it here. The dough was more glutinous and the filling was exceptional. The meatiest, juiciest and most strongly spiced filling of any momo I've had here. Excellent and probably the best filling I've found yet. Salsa like momo ko achar.

Phaksha-Chura came as a stew of pork belly which was flavored with an undertone of blue cheese. The cheese flavor as subtle and it largely pierced through an otherwise spicy broth. Generous amounts of potatoes and luscious chunks of thick cut pork belly. Good dish. I'd get it again.

The chicken shabhalay came two to a portion. Be careful diving into these. I remember letting mine sit for ages only to still burn myself when I bit it. Delicious chicken momo like filling though drier. Very good pastry and filling, but not really like a Uighur samsa.

Finally we got a fried bread which was well made, freshly fried and basically like an Indian puri.

The meal was finished with nicely made Tibetan butter tea, though I had to add salt (but that's my preference anyway. I always want Tibetan butter tea to be Uighur butter tea.)

Pictured are the phaksha-chura, the fried bread, the momo at both places, the soup at the first one, The first few pics are from Kailash while the last two are from Gurkha Cafe.

Back to top