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Roasting Lamb Shoulder

THE best lamb shoulder roast we've ever eaten - BAR NONE!


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Home Cooking Roasting Lamb Shoulder

THE best lamb shoulder roast we've ever eaten - BAR NONE!

c oliver | | Sep 2, 2009 11:44 AM

I had a 5-1/2# bone-in lamb shoulder roast and looking for something to do with it. I regularly make Will Owens' (adapted from the LA TImes) pork shoulder roast. It was actually my husband who said "what about Will Owen's recipe but use the lamb?") I left out the chili peppers and used lime juice instead of lemon cause that's what I had. It took about six hours to get past 190 degrees and falling off the bone. This roast had a good-sized cap of fat and plenty inside it also. I poured off the "jus" into a small saucepan, put in the fridge and added some ice cubes to cool it down quickly (we were wanting to eat in about an hour). It was really shocking how much congealed fat I lifted off - probably 3/4". Then put it back on the stove and boiled to reduce a bit. This lamb was incredible - perhaps the best lamb we've ever had and we LOVE lamb. I can't recommend this highly enough. Here's the recipe (in its pork version) in case you want to try it:

"I think I've posted this here before - it calls for a bigger roast than you have, but I've made it with a four-pounder and it came out well. Delicious.

SLOW-ROASTED PORK SHOULDER (adapted from the LA Times)

10 peeled cloves garlic

1/2 cup fennel seeds

2 tablespoons coarse sea salt

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

5 to 6 crumbled small dried red chiles, incl. seeds

1 pork shoulder butt, bone-in or boneless (about 6 to 7 pounds)

1/2 cup hot water

Juice of 1 lemon

1/2 cup chicken broth

olive oil

1. Heat the oven to 450 degrees. Using a mortar and pestle, crush the garlic and fennel seeds and mix them together. Add the salt, pepper and chiles and combine.

2. Cut 1-inch wide slits all over the surface including top and bottom of meat. Rub the garlic-seed mixture into the slits.

3. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a large, heavy Dutch oven. Sear the meat on all sides over medium-low heat for about 10 to 12 minutes. Don't burn the garlic!.

4. Remove the roast from the pot, add the hot water, scraping the bottom to deglaze the pan. Place a rack in the bottom of the pan, add the meat, fat side up, and roast uncovered for 30 minutes.

5. Pour the lemon juice and the chicken broth over the meat. Brush with more olive oil.

6. Reduce the heat to 250 degrees, cover the pan and roast the meat 8 to 10 hours, occasionally basting with pan juices. The roast will be done when the meat falls apart when poked with a fork.

7. Remove the roast from the pot and place it on a serving platter. Skim the fat from the pan drippings and serve these on the side or drizzled over the meat.

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Will Owen Dec 24, 2008 10:51AM

EDIT: When I do smaller roasts than the original recipe, I reduce the dry seasoning but use the original amounts of the wet.