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Enameled Cast Iron - need the final word on seasoning

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Enameled Cast Iron - need the final word on seasoning

matchswain | Dec 9, 2010 07:36 PM

Hello all,

My apologies for the long post.

After years of envy, I've slowly accumulated a few pieces of enameled cast iron for my kitchen. I've got a newer 10.25 Le Creuset skillet, a vintage Cousances skillet (23, I think) and a vintage Descoware skillet with a light-grey interior.

I've read every article and thread I can find about seasoning enameled cast iron, and I'm still unclear, so I hope that you can help. The fundamental question is: should I?

The Le Creuset is the Satin, black interior, and I've cooked enough bacon and other greasy things in it that it's got a nice patina starting. However, is that necessary (or even good for the pan) when it's enameled? Should I clean it and forget trying to get a patina in the bottom, or is Staub's advice about oil "penetrating the pores" of the pan the way to go? I keep reading comments that say "there is no need to season enameled cast iron."

The Cousances was obviously well-loved, as it's got an gorgeous smooth seasoned interior that won't hold onto eggs even with a minimum amount of oil.

The Descoware....well, food sticks. The surface is clean and smooth, but I have to use quite a bit of oil to be able to cook without all kinds of residue in the bottom of the pan. It's a beautiful pan but I find myself using it less than the others just because of the sticking. Should I season it, or just cook different foods?

If there's a thread that already discusses this, just send me on my way. Otherwise, thanks in advance for your replies.

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