Why is all bakewear non-stick?


Cookware Nonstick

Why is all bakewear non-stick?

rockandroller1 | | Dec 13, 2008 06:40 PM

Is this a stupid question? Perhaps. I know my fellow 'hounds will put me in my place if so.

I'm not much of a baker but growing up I remember my mom's pans not having any non-stick coating. I don't even think Teflon was around until my late childhood and then, she only had one skillet that had it which we used for eggs.

Some years ago, mr. rockandroller and I got rid of all our Teflon pans, I loathe it and don't think it's particularly safe. We don't have a ton of pans but what we have is either stainless or cast iron and it works just fine for us.

I discovered by accident, a rare recent baking episode, that I no longer have any loaf pans, no idea what happened to them, and that my sole muffin pan was really rusted and awful looking (I think it was non-stick some years ago but now just looked dangerous so I got rid of it). I went to 4 typical, regular stores today (not specialty or restaurant supply places) to try to get some inexpensive but decent loaf pans and a muffin pan. EVERYTHING is non-stick. Or silicone, which I just don't want to try. The way the silicone pan flopped around when I picked it up spelled disaster for me as a cook, I'm clumsy enough. Plus it just seems weird, and not having been around long enough to get a true measure of it's safety as bakeware (what you might ingest).

I ended up having to buy non-stick as there was literally nothing else. I suppose I could go to a W-S or try to find a restaurant supply place and spend $50 on one pan, but I really didn't want to spend that much. I had no idea it was so prevalent in bakeware.

Maybe it's because I don't bake much, but am I stupid? Why is all bakeware sold in the regular stores (BBB, department stores, etc.) non-stick? They sell pans and skillets in both stainless and non-stick, and BBB even sells some cast iron, so why is it just the bakeware that's non-stick?

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