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The Basics: How to Make Chocolate Mousse

The Basics: How to Make Chocolate Mousse

It’s not often that you run across a homemade dessert that can be made easily and on a whim. Most recipes will have you waiting for the oven to preheat and tracking down that cake pan you haven’t used in ages. Chocolate mousse, on the other hand, asks that you bring little more than a few bowls and a readiness to whisk—no tiresome baking, sifting, kneading, or frosting. This is one of those rare desserts that can be made easily on a weeknight: it calls for a mere three ingredients and takes hardly any time to prep. Because it’s so barebones, you’ll want to make sure that you’re using high-quality ingredients, especially when it comes to the chocolate. When you dig into the finished product with a spoon you’ll understand why: this mousse is first and foremost a vehicle for all of cocoa’s complexities, set afloat by a quiff of air. READ MORE

13 Recipes That Make the Most of Your Muffin Tin

13 Recipes That Make the Most of Your Muffin Tin

Who says you have to stick to baking regular old muffins in your muffin tin? Get creative! READ MORE

The Ultimate Guide to French Food

The Ultimate Guide to French Food

America has a long history of elevating French food to the status of the rare, the fancy, and the untouchable by ordinary home cooks. But since 1961, at least, with the appearance of volume one of Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle, and Simone Beck’s , America established another tradition: demystifying French food for home cooks. “Good and honest cooking and good and honest French cooking are the same thing,” American expat Richard Olney wrote in (1970). In other words, authentically French cooking is nothing an average home cook should be afraid to attempt, as long as one approaches it with energy and discernment. READ MORE

Super Bowl Party Playbook

Super Bowl Party Playbook

Tackling the game-day festivities. READ MORE

5 Things Julia Child Taught Us About Valentine’s Day

5 Things Julia Child Taught Us About Valentine’s Day

Julia Child had a thing for Valentine’s Day. In the 1950s in Paris, America’s greatest-ever French cookbook author would spend nearly as much time with her husband, Paul, crafting original Valentines, as she would perfecting a soufflé recipe. “Valentines cards had become a tradition of ours,” Julia writes in her posthumously published memoir, , “born of the fact that we could never get ourselves organized in time to send out Christmas cards.” One year, Julia and Paul created a Valentine in the shape of a stained glass window, with each of the five panels having to be painted by hand. “For 1956,” she writes, “we decided to lighten up by doing something different. We posed ourselves for a self-timed valentine photo in the bathtub, wearing nothing but artfully placed soap bubbles.” Bubbles were only the beginning of Julia’s Valentine’s Day wisdom. Here are five tips for navigating a home-cooked romantic French feast for two. READ MORE

Why You Should Definitely Cook Bacon in the Oven

Why You Should Definitely Cook Bacon in the Oven

There’s something nice and nostalgic about bacon sizzling in an iron pan on the stovetop, isn’t there? Well, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but that nostalgia is a farce. This isn’t an argument against cast iron pans per se, because there are many things that cast iron pans are good at doing (hello, perfectly seared steaks). But if you want bacon that crisps and cooks evenly, you’re better off sticking it in the oven. READ MORE

13 Pasta Recipes to Keep You Cozy Through This Weekend’s Snow Storm

13 Pasta Recipes to Keep You Cozy Through This Weekend’s Snow Storm

There are few foods that can adapt and change with the seasons quite like pasta. It opens its embrace to vegetables like asparagus and artichoke in the spring, gets along famously with fresh tomatoes and basil in the summer, and plays host to mushrooms and squashes in the fall. But I find myself eating the most pasta during the chilly depths of winter (especially during winter storms), and not just because I’m trying to store energy by carb-loading before facing the freezing temperatures and imminent snow frenzy. This is the time for reveling in rich sauces, layers upon layers of cheese, and filling bits of meat—the things that turn pasta into a luxuriant, sumptuous feast. It’s the season for breaking out the crock pots and casseroles, and for simmering and baking your way to strands of noodle drenched in ragu, or rigatoni crowned with a crispy, singed top. READ MORE

25 Meat-Tastic Ways to Celebrate Super Bowl 2016

25 Meat-Tastic Ways to Celebrate Super Bowl 2016

I can’t really explain it, but whenever I sit down to watch football, I get a sudden craving for foods loaded with meat. Is that a studly, handsome quarterback with bulging arm muscles making a heroic play? Pass the hot wings. Did those players just fall on top of each other and tussle around on the field? Give me a cocktail wiener, stat. READ MORE

The Ultimate Guide to Tacos

The Ultimate Guide to Tacos

It’s hard to think of another food with the dual identity of tacos. On any given night in Mexico City, at Taqueria Álvaro Obregón in the Roma Norte neighborhood, a hefty mustachioed taquero shaves pastor pork from his trompo onto small tortillas, tacos for drunk Chilangos (as Mexico City residents are known) under the sober gaze of General Obregón himself, framed and behind glass. Meanwhile, a couple of miles away at Pujol, chef Enrique Olvera’s high-end modern Mexican restaurant (currently number nine on Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants) you might find yourself looking down at a lamb “taco”: a perfect tortilla stained green with cactus paddles, delicately spooned with a little lamb barbacoa, a seared onion, and incredibly smooth blobs of avocado puree. These days, tacos can be high or low, cheap and ubiquitous, or rare and pricey. Once almost exclusively the food of the streets in Mexico, tacos exploded in the late 20th century to become almost ubiquitous and variable as the sandwich. From roving vendors in Mexico City hawking tacos al a canasta from plastic-lined baskets to the Doritos Locos Tacos at Taco Bell, and from fish tacos at home to Empellón Taqueria in Manhattan, for Brussels sprout and almond tacos by chef Alex Stupak, author of READ MORE

How to Make French Toast

How to Make French Toast

Breakfast with flair. READ MORE