Not-So-Ancient Secrets to the Perfect Wonton

Dean Sin World has been a longtime Chowhound favorite for Shanghai fare, especially the xiao long bao, those beloved juicy, soup-filled dumplings. A recent interview conducted by TonyC offers new insights about the restaurant and its cook.

First of all, it turns out that owner Mrs. Lu was a three-star chef at a big-name restaurant in Shanghai. Though things are more low-key at Dean Sin World, she seems to enjoy and feel passionate about "specializing in downscale comfort pastries, dumplings, huan duan's and the whole 9 yards," says K K.

Mrs. Lu also revealed in TonyC's interview that she was famous for her braised pork belly in China. She says that even though it's off-menu, if you call ahead, she's happy to make it for you.

And Mr Taster urges us to not get too fixated on the xiao long bao because a number of items on the menu are worth trying. "I've fallen in love with their wonton soup," Mr Taster says. "So clean and fresh, with little strips of seaweed which give it a distinct flavor. She's always generous with the wontons, which are perfectly but simply made."

And, most notably, Mr Taster has unearthed Dean Sin World's secret to making perfect wontons. "I found out that in order to prevent the wonton skins from sogging out and overcooking as they sit in the hot soup, they employ the Ancient Chinese Secret of microwaving and [then] boiling the wontons. My theory is that microwaving the wontons serves 2 purposes ... 1) It dries out the water in the skin, making it more resistant to overcooking while standing in the soup and 2) It par-cooks the pork filling so that it minimizes the amount of time the skins need to be in the boiling water."

Dean Sin World [San Gabriel Valley]
306 N. Garfield Avenue #2, Monterey Park
626-571-0636

Discuss: Dean Sin World update: braised pork belly!?!?!?

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