Raisinets’ Bold Move into Alternative Fruits

Cherry Raisinets

Cherry Raisinets

I Paid: $2.99 for a 4-ounce bag (prices may vary by region)

Taste: 4 stars

Marketing: 4 stars

So here's the thing that I need to start off with, and will return to before this review is over: Can you really have a Cherry Raisinet? The very name itself is a contradiction ... well, more on that later.

First: Nestlé is making Cherry Raisinets. Second, they're good. Using dried cherries instead of raisins transforms this movie theater staple into something new: The big dried cherry halves bring real fruit soul to the snack, and the resulting dessert has a strong chocolate lead followed by a nice cherry finish. Scharffen Berger this ain't, but it's not bad, either—the chocolate's dark and has some depth to it.

Now, back to the initial question. Raisinet is a term of art meant by Nestlé to mean—based on its expansive use, including Cranberry Raisinets—"some sort of dried fruit covered in chocolate." Most consumers would probably understand that, as it's clear through the usage. That said: Couldn't you have Cranberryets and Cherryets? Wouldn't that also link up with the original Raisinet naming convention while keeping each name true to the dried fruit at hand?

So, can you have a Cherry Raisinet? Yes. Should you? Absolutely not from a naming perspective, but from a food perspective, sure. If you're lucky enough to see these things at the theater, grab ’em over the originals.

James Norton edits the Upper Midwestern food journal Heavy Table. He's also the coauthor of a book on Wisconsin's master cheesemakers. Follow Chowhound on Twitter, and become a fan on Facebook.

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