The Pitfalls of Promising to Cook the Book

Cooking the entire French Laundry Cookbook at home is no easy task, but that is just what Carol is attempting to do on her blog, French Laundry at Home. What happens, however, when she hits a recipe that sounds awful—one she knows she would just hate, due to her dislike of oysters? Does she skip it, or suffer through?

The real confession is, I made this dish but didn’t taste it. It’s the first recipe I’ve made from The French Laundry Cookbook that I didn’t even take a nibble of. Why? Two words: pickled oysters. Separate yet equally disgusting tastes/smells/textures that when put together really make me wanna hurl. … So, I only made half the recipe because I could only find three tasters, and none of them were really all that excited about the prospect of this dish. I’m sure it had absolutely nothing to do with the way I marketed it to them, what with the wrinkled nose, armpit farting noises, gagging sounds, spastic Bob Fosse moves, and dry heaves.

I’d say that Carol is a trooper (I’d have skipped it myself). At the end of the day that’s what it’s all about: knowing you have made every single labor-intensive, exceedingly refined, overly elaborate dish in the 100-recipe book. Thomas Keller should be proud.

And Carol is having the last word: “I’m sure some of you will email me or comment … ‘you really should have tried it—it’s quite good’ to which I reply, I don’t care and no frickin’ way.”

See more articles
Share this article: